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Medicinal Chemistry: Home

Welcome to the research guide for Medicinal Chemistry.

If you have any questions or feedback, please don't hesitate to get in touch with me. My contact information is to the right.

Please see About the Macdonald-Kelce Library for information about our hours, collections, and services.

                  

Interesting local news: USF Receives Anti-MRSA Compound Patent:

"While previously used to treat malaria and cancer, work by the USF chemists resulted in a synthetic version of quinazoline that showed potential as antibacterial agents.

"They're wizards," Shaw said with a laugh. "They can take chemical structures and molecules and tweak and play with them, almost like Lego building blocks and create new derivatives, new variants and produce things that before, no one's ever done.'"

Getting Started

Resources for finding medical conditions and possible treatments:

The Merck Manual (also available online) and The 5-Minute Clinical Consult. The table of contents at the beginning of each book lists all the conditions and the page number to find them in the book.

Center for Disease Control (CDC) website. Click on the Diseases and Conditions link.

Health and Wellness Center (log into Esearch first). Click on "diseases and conditions," for definition, description, causes and symptoms, diagnosis, key terms, treatment, and prognosis. You can also look up drugs and alternative medicines.

Resources for finding drug information (Consider both the generic and brand name; searching the Internet can help with this):

Drugs Facts and Comparison: A comprehensive drug information reference source intended for health professionals. Arranged by therapeutic drug classes. Each entry (monograph) gives detailed information covering such topics as actions, adverse reactions, and overdosage.

Physicians’ Desk Reference (PDR): Guide to drug interactions, side effects, and indications. Includes chemical structure of drug.

Clinicaltrials.gov, a searchable database for potential drug treatments being tested.

All of the reference books listed above can be found on the first floor of the Library. Please ask at the reference desk if you need any assistance.

Literature Reviews

A literature review is conducted to unearth the most relevant research on a particular topic. You may confine your research to a certain field or sub-field, a particular theory or theories, a set time period, or any other parameters within your discipline or research interests. The point of a review is to find trends, evolving views, controversies within a topic, under-represented topics of research, or perhaps remaining questions to a problem. Check out our libguide on writing a literature review.

Your Librarian

Shannon Spencer
Contact:
Macdonald-Kelce Library, RM 155
813-257-3847
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