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Predatory Open Access Publishers: Glossary

This is an information resource for the those who attended our Predatory Publishing Panel.

Some Commonly Used Terms

Beall's List - University of Colorado librarian Jeffrey Beall maintains a list of questionable, scholarly open-access publishers and journals. While his list has become the de-facto resource for identifying unethical open access academic publishers, there are substantial concerns about the list's disproportionate role in identifying disreputable publishers. His blog and list can be found at Scholarly Open Access. (UPDATE: Beall removed his list in January 2017.)

Cabell's International (aka Cabell's Directory) - A directory that evaluates academic journals and provides quality metrics. Does not cover all disciplines. UT currently subscribes to Business, Information Technology, and Education components.

Directory of Open Access Journals - A list of reputable open access academic journals. Strives to include only journals of suitably high quality. See their FAQ.

Green Open Access - Depositing articles in an institutional repository, usually in addition to traditional publication.

Gold Open Access - Publishing in an open access journal.

Institutional Repository - An online archive of an institution's scholarly papers, deposited by their authors. Institutional repositories may also include datasets, theses and dissertations, administrative documents, course notes, learning objects, archived material, or conference proceedings

Open Access - Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions.

Predatory Publishing - In academic publishing, predatory open access publishing is an exploitative open-access publishing business model that involves charging publication fees to authors without providing the editorial and publishing services associated with legitimate journals (open access or not).

Public Access Mandate - The NIH Public Access Policy is an open access mandate requiring that research papers describing research funded by the National Institutes of Health must be available to the public for free through PubMed Central within 12 months of publication. In this scheme, the research papers have an open access license applied to them and PubMed Central is the self-archiving repository in which authors deposit their publications. There are legislative efforts to expand this to funding agencies beyond the NIH.