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Scholarly Communication @ UT: Author's RIghts

A guide to learn more about scholarly communication, including open access, copyright, and grant funding resources.

Terms to Know

Copyright: Copyright law protects creative works. Examples of types of works protected by copyright law include books, journal articles, websites, blogs, photographs, films, videos, audio & visual recordings, and software programs.

Within copyright you have five rights: the right to reproduce copies, make derivative works, distribute copies, and perform or display the work publicly. 

Embargo:  A period of time where the publication or dissemination of a work is delayed.

Creative Commons Licenses:  A Creative Commons license can apply to all works that are protected by copyright law. With a Creative Commons license you can communicate to others how they can use your work while retaining full copyright of your work. 

Publisher Policies

Major publishers have standard copyright and archiving policies. If your publisher is not included in the list below, you can search SHERPA/RoMEO by journal or publisher, or consult the journal's website.

Your Author Rights

You know what you write, but do you know your rights?

  • You own what you create. As the author of a work you are automatically the copyright holder. Copyright registration is not required.
  • You retain your copyright unless you transfer the copyright to someone else in a signed agreement, such as a journal publisher.
  • The copyright holder controls the work. 
  • Transferring copyright doesn't have to be "all or nothing."
  • Giving your copyright to a publisher could hinder your future uses of your work.

Creative Commons Licenses

Images shows the three types of Creative Commons licensesWith a Creative Commons license you keep your copyright, but communicate to others how they can use your work.

 

This Creative Commons license generator will help you choose what Creative Commons license you need.