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Macdonald-Kelce Library

Political Science

A guide to politics, policy, and political science.

Purpose

The purpose of this guide is to help you successfully locate high-quality information for research projects in your Political Science classes.

  • You might find the Introduction to Library Research useful if you've never worked on a research project at the university level.
  • If you need help getting started, finding information, or have a question about resources, get in touch with the Political Science librarian: ddavisson@ut.edu
  • In order to access the library electronic materials (books, journals and databases) log in to MyUTampa
  • If you need assistance with your Spartans Domain log-in information, please contact the IT Help Desk at StudentHelp@ut.edu or at x6255.

Suggested Steps

Use the tabs to the left to navigate this guide.


  1. Best Bets - Start with a couple of quick searches of Summon (library catalog) or a database like ProQuest to get a feel for the type and quantity of sources available. Play around with the suggested search terms.

  2. Background InformationSometimes you need a definition or basic fact for your paper that you can't find in a scholarly article. Or perhaps you need a more basic understanding of your topic before diving deeper into scholarly research. This is where reference sources, such as specialized encyclopedias, come in handy.

  3. Books - Start here if all you need right now are books for your project.

  4. Articles - You likely found a few articles searching Summon and Business Source Complete. Now, dive deeper into additional subject-specialized databases to find even more articles. Don't forget to try different search terms.

  5. Websites - These professional and non-profit websites may prove useful for your research.

  6. Citations - Proper citation is a critical part of the scholarly process.

  7. Not having any luck? - Get in touch with someone who can help.

Suggested Search Terms

Variants

    Administration
    Civil government
    Commonwealth, The
    Government
    Political theory
    Political thought
    Politics
    Science, Political

Broader Terms

    Social sciences

Narrower Terms

    Aristocracy (Political science)
    Authoritarianism
    Biopolitics
    Bureaucracy
    Citizenship
    City-states
    Civics
    Common good
    Communication in politics
    Comparative government
    Conservatism
    Corporate state
    Cosmopolitanism
    Coups d'état
    Decentralization in government
    Delegation of powers
    Democracy
    Democratization
    Divided government
    Elections
    Equality
    Executive power
    Failed states
    Federal government
    Filibusters (Political science)
    Government, Resistance to
    Hegemony
    Ideology
    Imperialism
    Individualism
    International organization
    Liberalism
    Liberty
    Monarchy
    Nationalism
    Newly independent states
    Oligarchy
    Opposition (Political science)
    People's democracies
    Plebiscite
    Plutocracy
    Polarization (Social sciences)
    Police power
    Political anthropology
    Political culture
    Political development
    Political obligation
    Political parties
    Political psychology
    Political sociology
    Politics, Practical
    Populism
    Postcolonialism
    Power (Social sciences)
    Pressure groups
    Public administration
    Public domain
    Radicalism
    Radicalization
    Religion and politics
    Representative government and representation
    Republicanism
    Republics
    Restorations, Political
    Revolutions
    Right and left (Political science)
    Separation of powers
    Social contract
    Sovereignty
    States, Size of
    States, Small
    Subnational governments
    Symbolism in politics
    Television and politics
    Tribal government
    Utopias
    Village communities
    World politics

Macdonald-Kelce Library - The University of Tampa - 401 W. Kennedy Blvd. - Tampa, FL 33606 - 813 257-3056 - library@ut.edu - Accessibility